2017-2018 PROJECT-BASED LEARNING

Sweet Sacred Spaces

STREAM learning calls for the incorporation of science, technology, religion, engineering, art, and math, but a project this year for eighth graders took it one step further by incorporating food!  In advance of the opening of our own cathedral, students studied and created scaled replicas of some of the world’s most famous cathedrals using candy and other sweets.

They researched and wrote reports on the histories of these amazing buildings, many of which were true feats of engineering and technology for their time.  Then, the students did the calculations to recreate these stunning structures to scale using only materials from their local grocery stores.  The results are a testament to their creativity and are a tribute to the hard-working men and women who  gave so much of themselves to build these wonderful sacred spaces.

 

2016-2017 PROJECT-BASED LEARNING

The culmination of two years of study came at the Sacred Heart Cathedral School Sacred Space Assembly, which took place in late spring 2017. Our eighth-grade hosts interviewed representatives from each grade, and the whole school community got to watch nine short videos on the driving questions each grade tackled in their project-based learning assignments.

While we saw how much students learned about measurement, engineering, materials, and manpower in our 2016 assembly, this year’s assembly centered on the theme of sacred space as plans for the rose window, altar, saint statues, and baptismal font come to fruition.

This project was fun, challenging work that helped our students grow in the knowledge of their faith and in their understanding of the Cathedral that is rising before the eyes of those who will worship there. As the only Catholic school in this country that is connected to a new Cathedral, we have had a unique and transformational spiritual and academic journey.

How is sacred space created?

How are devotion to the Sacred Heart and the saints incorporated in the Cathedral?

How do geometrical shapes and intentionally chosen numbers in our new Cathedral reflect the Catholic faith?